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Posts Tagged ‘real estate’

I just found out that I was quoted several times earlier this year about high end finishes and luxury amenities in Coldwell Banker’s prestigious “Coldwell Banker Previews International Portfolio: Exceptional Gold Coast Florida Residences”, Volume 2, 2009, in an article entitled “Finishing Touches Tell the Story” by Camilla McLaughlin.

“People just don’t want that run of the mill thing anymore. Everything is custom designed,” says Wendy Hoechstetter, an interior designer in the Bay area [sic]. Fabric that cost $580 a yard, custom furniture, even entire rooms brought over from Europe are not unusual.”

“One of the strongest trends is wallpaper, which is back in vogue. Large punchy patterns, often an up-to-date interpretation of a classic such as paisley, or fabrics such as silk or grass cloth, create dramatic focal points on a single wall. Elsewhere, whimsical patterns or luxurious materials turn small spaces such as powder rooms into jewel boxes.

“We’re seeing wall coverings made out of every material you can imagine—bamboo, mica, all kinds of metals.You name it, they’re putting it in walls,” says Hoechstetter.”

There is a lot of other good information on luxury home materials and designs in this article, as well as in other articles in the publication, so do take a look at the whole thing.

There doesn’t seem to be a way to link directly to the article, which is in PDF format, without linking to the boring, picture-less HTML version, but if you’d like to see it, you can either email me and ask me to send you a copy, or you can go to this Google search page, and click on the middle item, vapidly entitled “Layout1”, as shown below:

Google Listing

If the search page disappears or messes up somehow, just Google “Camilla McLaughlin” and “Wendy Hoechstetter”.

If I can figure out how to post it here on my blog, I’ll eventually get it up.

I am also expecting to be quoted in another article either Monday October 19th or 26th in the New York Times online and likely another website called Cyberhomes.com, about window treatments. Keep an eye out for the piece! I’ll post an alert and links when it comes out.

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Nowadays more than ever in most of our lifetimes, we need to be sure that the money we invest in our homes is well-spent, and that we get the most bang for our buck.  Maybe you’ve put off moving because of the economy, or you’ve decided to downscale your remodeling plans.  Or maybe you’re just digging in and nesting, and looking for a way to spruce up the old homestead so you can comfortably get a few more years in there – or perhaps because you feel like a facelift for the place is just the right nurturing thing to do for yourself right now.

Even in the best of times, I am often asked what remodelling projects are most likely to deliver the most payback when it comes to resale, and whether or not they will get their money out of a project, but now more than ever, it’s on people’s minds.  This is a complex question, because so many factors are involved, and it’s different in different parts of the country.  Here’s a handy website on which you can check the odds of a payback and an estimate of remodelling cost vs value for various types of projects – by area of the country.

Keep in mind that unless you’re planning to move in the next year or so, these payback figures will decrease over time, and will probably not yield a whole lot of advantage several years down the road, at least not as much.  If you think you’re going to stay put for a few years, then I recommend that you not worry as much about resale values, and focus more on making sure you create a space that really suits your own present needs and preferences.  If you are planning to stay there for the rest of your life, resale payback really becomes a completelymoot point, and you should absolutely make sure you do whatever works for you, and don’t worry at all about what someone else might want later.

In both of these latter situations, you may want or need to plan the project out in stages, if money is tight.  A good interior designer can be invaluable in helping prioritize and plan for any remodel, but particularly if you’re going to do it in phases.

So, what’s your next project going to be?  And how can I assist you in creating the home of your dreams?

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